Welcome to Thomas Pocklington Trust’s website

Author: Elizabeth McLoughlin


Guide to Finding a Home for Visually Impaired People

Introduction This online guide aims to share information for visually impaired people who are looking for a new house, to live independently for the first time, or are experiencing problems in their current accommodation.  It will share personal experiences from visually impaired people who have different life circumstances, provide useful suggestions, and signpost to sources for further advice. The guide is designed to be an interactive tool so any comments, suggestions or personal accounts are welcomed. Please see the contact us link to get in touch. To browse the guide, please choose the next page button.  Or to help us direct you to the most relevant information, please select a link below that best describes your personal circumstances: What are your circumstances now? I want to think about my options for a future move; I am or will be a student; I need information on living independently; I need information on the moving process; I am homeless or facing homelessness/eviction; I need to move urgently – I don’t feel safe where I am living now; My current home requires repairs or adaptations; Jargon Buster   Guide Contents Guide to Finding a Home for Visually Impaired People I want to think about my options for a Future Move I am or will be a student I need information on living independently; I need information on the moving process; I am homeless...

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I want to think about my options for a Future Move

People decide to move to a new home for different reasons.  You might be considering a move out of the family home for the first time; you might need to move to start a new job or a course; to move in with your partner (or out, following the breakdown of a relationship) or you might be looking for somewhere cheaper, more secure, bigger or better located. The main housing options available involve: Renting from a private landlord; Renting from a social or not-for-profit landlord – a local authority, housing association or housing cooperative; Buying (or part-buying) your own home; Some general things to think about, especially if it will be your first move to independent living, drawing on the experiences of visually impaired young adults who have already done it; Information about private renting, social renting and (part-) buying a home; Benefits and finances – to work out what you will be able to afford; Further places to go for advice and information If you are (or plan to be) a student, please go to our section on student housing General considerations before moving It is important to think about what you need from your home. What are your priorities for a new home and what are the aspects you would be prepared to compromise on? The following podcast contains advice and pointers from a number of different visually...

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Congratulations Louise!

On Sunday, Louise Fairhurst, our Head of Finance Projects, completed the London Marathon! Louise ran to raise money for East London Vision (ELVis), a local sight loss organisation and an important part of the Pocklington Family. Louise completed the marathon in an incredible 04:11:57. We are very proud of her. It’s not too late to donate! If you would like to sponsor Louise please visit: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/LouiseFairhurst You can find out about ELVis and the fantastic services they provide by visiting http://www.eastlondonvision.org.uk/  ...

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CEO Blog April

Yesterday the Government implemented cuts to the Employment and Support Allowance which will see new claimants placed in the Work Related Activity Group (WRAG) go without the work-related activity component of £29 per week. This puts these individuals £1,500 worse off a year compared to existing claimants. I am strongly opposed to these significant cuts and believe that it is vital that financial support is available for blind and partially sighted people. As a charity we have responded to these latest cuts and you can read our response here. On a more positive note, it was a pleasure to...

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TPT’s response to cuts to the Employment and Support Allowance

Thomas Pocklington Trust (TPT) remains strongly opposed to the Government’s decision to implement significant cuts to the Employment and Support Allowance. As of 3rd April new claimants placed in the Work Related Activity Group (WRAG) will not get the work-related activity component of £29 per week and will consequently  receive up to £1,500 less each year compared to existing claimants, set to save the government around £650 million per year. TPT remains firm in the view that it is fundamental that financial support is available for blind and partially sighted people. Rather than incentivising people to find work, TPT...

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