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Category: Guest Blog

Guest Blog


My network travel experience with customers with visual impairments

George Rogers, a representative from the West Midlands Combined Authority, writes to his colleagues about his experience catching public transport while wearing sim-specs with Thomas Pocklington Trust staff and members of the Birmingham Sight Loss Council. On a wet Friday afternoon in September I joined my colleague Anna Sirmoglou and two visually impaired customers for a tour around our transport network from a visual impairment perspective. Andy an Mark, members of the Birmingham Sight Loss Council, met me with smiles and I soon realised that I would be the guinea pig on the day: I thought I would be...

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Prudential Ride London 46 on a tandem bike

Alex Pepper, 27, has been sight impaired his whole life and lost his functional sight in early 2016. Alex, a Project Coordinator at Thomas Pocklington Trust, has written about his experience training for and cycling in Prudential Ride London 46. Entering the Ride London 46 was something I hadn’t really planned to do initially.  It came about after speaking to Wheels for Wellbeing about arranging some tandem cycling track events in Croydon for the local visually impaired (VI) residents to try out.  Abigail, who worked for the charity, told me about her experience doing the ride last year, and...

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Learning to swim with South East London Vision

Ian Rattray, a 52-year-old member of South East London Vision (SELVis), has written about his experience taking swimming lessons organised by SELVis and the charity Sense. Ian was born short-sighted so he has never had 20:20 vision, and he was recently diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa. My first experience of water as a child was not a good one. When I was around 4 or 5 my sister and I managed to capsize a pedalo.  I had to be rescued from the pool we were in.  This was not helped by swimming lessons at school where I was generally ignored....

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Can you be a bit blind?

Can you be a bit blind? – The way that sight loss and blindness is understood in the wider population is, in my view, a barometer of our success  in getting people to grasp the importance of eye health. By this, I don’t just mean those that are registered blind, or indeed those that are at risk of it. I mean all of us – the whole community. As the population lives longer, the prevalence of sight loss is rising. Coupled with this, lifestyle choices are also bringing conditions such as diabetic retinopathy into people’s lives. In short, eye...

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The Power of Social Media When You Have a Disability

Guest blog by Emily Davison – author of the blog Fashioneyesta. Social media, it seems to be taking over the world these days. It dominates many news stories and it’s a key way that people find out news on current affairs, their favoured celebrities and share news on their own lives. With there being so many apps created to allow people to network and share their lives with the world, some may ask ‘why?’ and ‘what’s the point of it all?’ Allow me to introduce myself; my name is Emily Davison, although in the cyber world I’m more commonly...

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Athletics helped former Commonwealth Games competitor deal with her sight loss

Guest Blog by former Commonwealth Games competitor Selina Litt. Find her blog page Insight Out here There’s no way of sugar coating it, losing your sight is tough. It’s not fair. You ask ‘why me’?! I have a rare genetic eye condition called Norrie’s Disease, which is only meant to affect males, but guess what I defied the odds and was the first female in the world to be diagnosed with the condition. Lucky me! In a sense I am lucky though. I am glad that I had the opportunity to see.  It has nearly been ten years since I have...

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Pen labelling for blind people

Guest Blog by Barbara. Blog page…. There was a lady on this morning a little while ago, who was blind and wore makeup. Her boyfriend and dog accompanied her, and the way she used to wear her makeup, she would label her makeup with a blind pen which is sold from the RNIB shop, for £75. The labelling is speech affected and she would label up her eyeliner, her mascara and lipstick whatever colour they were. She wasn’t fully blind, she could see light or dark. Follow the link to the labelling pen in the RNIB shop… Another name...

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