Tom Quilter from the Council for Disabled Children joined TPT to outline what rights and entitlements vision impaired children have within school. This included:

  • What are the responsibilities of the Local Authority to ensure a child or young person has access to the right education?
  • What are the legal responsibilities as a parent or carer?
  • How can parents or carers challenge if they think a child or young person, isn’t getting access to the education, support and/or services to which they are entitled?

Tom provided information about the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Information Advice and Support Service (SENDIASS) which is available for free to parents of children with disabilities in England.  SENDIASS teams can provide information about education, health and social care for children, young people and their parents.

Here are the slides from the session


For those who missed the webinar or want to catch this again here is the recording from the session:



About Tom Quilter

Tom is responsible for the management and development of the national network of information, advice and support services –working alongside the 152 statutory local IAS’s to help them stay connected, ensure they have the training, information and tools that they need to support the children, young people and families in their area. As well as ensuring their successes and challenges are heard and understood by DFE, policy makers and other stakeholders.

Tom has worked with children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities since he was fourteen.

He began in a befriending and support worker role before going to university to study a BA in Social Policy. In the time since leaving university he has completed his MSc in Social Research and worked within local authorities, social enterprises and the charity sector in service delivery, strategic management and campaigning and influencing roles.


About Emma Cruickshank 

Head and shoulders photo of Emma Cruickshank.


Emma is a qualified Rehabilitation Officer, and has worked in the sight loss sector for 20 years, gaining experience in the public, private and voluntary sector. 

Over her career she has worked with blind and partially sighted people to ensure their voice is heard and they can participate fully in a more inclusive society.

She has worked for Thomas Pocklington Trust for 4 years and leads the Children, young people and families team.